Huenenberg See, 16.05.2019

Meet Hoss Hauksson, the sole Icelandic wine-grower resident in the canton

 

That Hoss Hauksson is the only Icelandic wine-grower resident in Zug is certain, but he may also be the only Icelandic wine grower at all.

 

Reykjavik-born Hauksson has actually been living in Hünenberg See with his family for the past eight years, though the wine he produces comes from vineyards in the neighbouring cantons of Argovia and the Ticino. The calling is relatively new to him; until two years ago he was busier crunching figures than crushing grapes.

After having studied mathematics in California, Hauksson moved to London and worked for Goldman Sachs, going on to move to Switzerland and work at the Zürcher Kantonalbank and then at Tulos Capital in Baar.

 

As journalist Rahel Hug mentioned in this article, the Icelander has always been interested in wine, even trying to make it out of berries and rhubarb in his homeland. Then, in 2013, he bought his first grapes for production, turning them into wine in his laundry. Two years later, he bought his first vineyard in the Ticino at Gordemo, gradually but surely increasing the quality of his wines he made though experimentation.

 

Now, in addition to his vineyard in the Ticino, he runs two in Argovia, namely at Remigen and Döttingen. Production, now amounting to between 40,000 and 50,000 bottles year, is also in Argovia, at Rüfenach. “It gives me great pleasure to feel the sun on my back and the sweat pour from my forehead while working,” he said, as he admitted when speaking to a reporter from a wine magazine, adding that he had not regretted leaving finance for viniculture. “My timetable is now governed by nature, not other schedules,” he said. “It is wonderful to be able to let my thoughts run free when out working in the vineyards.”

 

Another great passion of Hauksson is hunting, and, since he has been in Zug, he has undertaken a course in it and in this way got into contact with people of the same ilk, which he has greatly enjoyed. Meeting locals in this way has been very important to him, providing him with something not obtainable through just mixing other expats. Of course, he often returns to his homeland and even sells his wine there. Naturally customers there are very impressed by the fact the Swiss wine they have bought has been made by a compatriot.

 

His wines, sold under the names “Solskin” (sunshine) and “Tunglskin” (moonlight) have labels depicting Viking runes and these can be bought from the Cortis wine merchants, and, incidentally, at the Krone in Sihlbrugg.

 

At present Hauksson is busy converting his production method to those based on bio-dynamic principles, reducing the types of vines he uses from 16 to eight, setting up an online shop and even distilling a schnapps. And he is really happy, having definitely found his niche.

 

Further information can be found on www.haukssonweine.ch